Monday, January 10, 2011

Nine reasons why cloth diapers are inferior (and one why they're better)


Today I'm veering away from my usual topic to discuss something much on my mind and daily routine these days: Baby stuff. At the end of the month, my wife and I have decided to to stop the diaper service we'd been using since Joel was born Oct. 1. It's not necessarily a permanent move; we're going to try a month of all disposable diapers and see how we feel about it.

The change is at my urging. We both wanted to pursue cloth diapering, a decision we made early in the pregnancy. We met with an excellent diaper service here in Indianapolis and signed up for three months of service. (For those who don't know what a diaper service does -- I didn't before -- they collect the dirty cloth diapers and deliver clean ones, so you don't have to wash them yourself or even buy diapers. You essentially rent them.)

But after three months, my opinion has evolved. Some of the benefits of cloth diapers have turned out not to be such a great improvement over disposable as hyped. And many, many downsides we didn't consider have cropped up.

So I thought I'd enumerate the reasons why I think cloth diapers aren't all they're cracked up to be.

You will be changing diapers ... a lot -- You'll often hear in commercials for disposable diapers a buzzword about "whisking" away wetness. Well, this is not just claptrap. Modern disposables have been engineered like an astronaut suit. Despite being thin and light, they can absorb a lot of urine. And they can do so without the baby feeling wet.

Not cloth diapers. As soon as a baby goes, he'll know it .. and so will you. The cotton diaper absorbs the pee, but holds it against his skin. No "whisking" of anything. The irritation the baby feels, and thus changings, are much more frequent than with a disposable.

The difference is even more pronounced if your child does not fall into "average" categories. Joel is an exceptionally large baby -- approaching 11 pounds at birth, and 19 pounds at three months old -- and as a result he goes a lot more. In a disposable he can often go several hours between changes. Whereas with cloth, it is not unusual for me to do six changes in less than an hour. (This is not an exaggeration.)

It's obviously a hassle for the parents, but more importantly I don't think it's good for the baby's mental and physical well-being to be constantly crying because he's wet and uncomfortable.

Leakage -- No matter how you fold your diapers -- and there are reams of Web sites with different methods, which we've studied -- cloth diapers leak more. We're mostly talking about feces here. Since cloth diapers are held essentially flat against baby's bottom, #2 has a tendency to squirt out the sides or back of the diaper (and on a couple of memorable occasions, out the front top). This dirties the diaper cover and probably whatever clothes baby was wearing, too. Disposables leak solid material, too, but in our experience much less often.

Clothes don't fit -- Normal baby clothes are difficult or impossible to fit around cloth diapers, which are much poofier than disposables -- I sometimes jokingly call Joel "M.C. Hammer" whenever he's got some onesie or sleeper stretched around his large, protruding pelvis.

It may not sound like a big deal, but unless you want to shell out for specialty clothing or knit your own, expect your kid to either look silly much of the time, or just not fit into most stuff.

Car seats, strollers, high chairs, swings, etc. don't fit, either -- Most child-restraint devices either attach to a seat belt that comes up between baby's legs, or has a solid post that fits snugly against his groin. Those extra few inches of diaper cloth can make it quite an ordeal to get baby to fit into car seats, high chairs, strollers, swings, and so forth. And these are high-ticket items where there isn't an alternative available. Not to mention the child's safety could be compromised by not fitting properly in his restraint seat.

Travel is restricted -- Traveling with a baby is never easy, but at least with disposable diapers you can pop one on him and throw away the old one. Not cloth -- you have to take all those large, bulky diapers and covers with you. And you have to hang onto the dirty ones until you get where you're going. And then you have to find someplace to wash them. Sound like fun?

Daycare is usually a no-cloth zone -- You'll find that few daycare operations will mess around with cloth diapers. Good luck finding one that will agree to use the cloth diapers and covers you provide, and save the smelly dirty ones for you to take home. Ditto for babysitters, friends, etc. who might watch baby short-term now and again.

Mom, I can't move! -- Joel had never flipped over on his own until we were visiting my parents for Christmas and were using all disposable diapers for the trip (for reasons listed above). We put him on his stomach, and all of a sudden he pushed himself over onto his back, several times in a row! We were amazed and pleased, and tried to repeat the feat upon returning home. Guess what -- those big, puffy pantaloons make it impossible for him to do it. Flipping over (back to front and front to back) is a major developmental milestone, and I think the cloth diapers hinder this process. I would expect similar problems with sitting up, crawling, standing, etc.

Dirty diapers = yechh -- Whether you're washing them yourself or have a diaper service, those nasty, stinky dirty cloths add up quickly. We haven't attempted to wash our own, but I can only imagine the drudgery of having to rinse out the poo, transfer them in and out of the washer and dryer, and folding them up. With our heavy-wetting baby, we'd have to do a load of wash every day, I should think.

Diaper service makes things much, much easier -- clean diapers arrive, neatly stacked and folded, once a week like magic. And the cost isn't bad: We pay $80 a month for 100 diapers per week. But, they only come once a week. What to do with those multiple bags of dirty cloth diapers? We didn't want them in the house -- even in the basement, we figure the smell would seep out. And there are curious pets about. So you've got to find someplace where the elements won't get at them.

In our case, we ended up putting them out on the front porch. That's where the diaper service collects them anyway. And we figure it's better than the garage. But it probably hasn't done too much for our image with neighbors, mailman and delivery services (which come back pretty much daily because of my work).

Cost savings are not that huge (if they exist at all) -- This is just a cursory calculation of the cost of disposable vs. cloth diapers. Your results may vary. But I'll just say if you think you're going to be pocketing thousands of extra dollars during the course of infancy, you'll be disappointed.

As I said, the diaper service costs $80 a month. But you have to purchase the diaper covers yourself. And you'll need to buy more every time the child graduates to the next size. (Joel is already onto the third size, which goes up to 35 pounds.) We've already invested about $200 in covers -- which we get to keep, even after they're too small.

If you're a member of a wholesaler chain like Costco or Sam's, disposables can be bought in bulk pretty cheap. I did a price check, and 228 Huggies (size 3) at Costco is $50, or just under 22 cents apiece.

But you have to factor in that you'll be doing fewer changes with disposable than cloth. My estimate is we only do 60 percent as many changes. So our heavy-wetting boy who goes through 15-18 cloth diapers a day will need nine to 11 disposables. By my calculation, that means we'll spend somewhere between $60 and $72 a month on disposables.

So even without factoring in the cost of the covers, it's actually less expensive to go disposable. Even if I'm wrong and we use disposables at a 1:1 ratio as cloth, the savings is quite minimal.

If you're hardcore and decide to eschew a service to wash the diapers yourself, you've still got to buy them -- and again, you're obligated to buy a whole new batch every time baby goes up a size. And then you've got to figure in the water, detergent and electricity to wash them, not to mention all the extra time you'll spend.

The only way I can see cloth being a major savings over disposable is if you have multiple children in a row and re-use them.

Environmental impact -- This, as far as I can see, is the one area where cloth diapers are have an unmitigated advantage. The impact on our environment to landfill all those disposable diapers is huge, no denying. But even if you're using cloth exclusively and every other baby in the neighborhood has their butt swaddled in disposables, your individual effort will not make a significant impact on the collective result.

I'm not anti-cloth diaper. For the right family and the right baby, I think they can be a good option. We may go back to cloth ourselves in the future, at least partially. But I wanted to lay out some of our real-world experiences so others can know exactly what they're getting into.

P.S. I changed Joel's cloth diaper seven times while I wrote this blog post.

106 comments:

  1. Joel's mom agrees, though we should point out that our cloth diapering is entirely based on using the prefolds with covers. There are multiple other systems out there which we have not tried--some made of bamboo, fleece etc. We chose to go with one of the the least expensive initial investments in cloth and the one that is compatible with the weekly diaper service which delivers prefolds. The company that offers our diaper service is fantastic in their offerings of different options at their store and online.

    After Joel's feat of flipping over while on vacation in a disposable diaper I am most concerned about how the bulkier cloth diaper may restrict his potential mobility. And I find it a little disturbing that at 19 lbs. he absolutely does not fit in his up to 22lbs infant car seat while wearing a cloth diaper. (His "big boy" car seat has been ordered).

    I remain interested in how cloth diapers may contribute to faster potty training in the future as that could be a factor in the overall cost savings.

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    1. I didn't start cloth until our son was 8 months, and we ordered his convertible car seat at 5 months because of fit issues with the crotch buckle. Sometimes it's just the car seat.

      I use cloth when we're out and about around town, but for longer trips I use disposables. It doesn't have to be all or nothing :) Also, please check out The Car Seat Lady in regards to cloth diapers and car safety, and Fluff Love University's on Facebook for tips on getting your cloth to work for you! There are thousands of awesome people more than willing to lend a hand, as it were. My quick tip is to see if your diaper service offers fleece liners to keep babe's bum dry:)

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  2. Also, on a daily basis I feel fortunate that we have these options when I think about what an absolute nightmare it must have been to keep a baby clean and diapered in 1900 or 1800!

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  3. You might even be able to get away with less changes than 9-11. With our first, it was probably 8 as newborn, then down to 5-6 by 4-6 months. With our second, I changed every 4-5 hours unless she pooped. :)
    @JGL== the only problem with using cloth diapers with potty training that I can foresee is that they would be hard/pain in the neck to pull down and up. They make underwear that has extra padding in the front to add a little more absorbancy (vs a big puddle), but luckily you have a little time to wait. :) Is there anyway to resell the covers? (Craigslist, etc) Or do people think that's gross? (I wouldn't!)

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  4. Thank you for your great article, I really appreciate your insight into this ongoing debate.

    As far as the environmental impact, I am currently working on a paper on this topic and have discovered that the environmental impact of the water and electricity used to clean cloth diapers basically negates the environmental advantage of cloth diapers. The only way to get around that is to have rain water collection and solar panels or line-drying. In addition, even hard core environmentalists have conceded that diapers make up for only about 1.8% of the waste in landfills, while discarded paper makes up for roughly 50%! One last note: there has recently been some advancement in recycling techniques for disposable diapers, which is great news for people who want to reduce their carbon footprint, but are concerned about the environmental impact of disposables.

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    1. Have you researched how much water and electricity goes in to make one disposable diaper?

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    2. If you have questions about cloth please don't base it all on this article. We love our cloth diapers.

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    3. We have used modern shaped cloth nappies on both our daughter's so i have 4 baby years experience of them and you have picked the wrong system! Shaped nappies are much better at containing poo than disposables. We have never had a leak with our cloth nappies but every time our youngest pooped in her overnight disposable it leaked so we had poo on our bed on a regular occurrence. Just about everyone also uses liners that hold wetness away from baby's bum, the only reason your baby feels wet is you, unfortunately, aren't doing that. Liners are incredibly easy and cheap to make yourself out of a thin fleece blanket. We store our wet and dirty ones in a plastic box and never have an odour to deal with. When we wash twice a week the poo just plops off the fleece into the toilet (occasionally we have to give them a rinse too with the shower hose into a bucket but not often) then the whole lot goes in the machine. We line dry outside in good weather and use a heated airer in wet weather or winter. It barely takes any time to do the washing. We had to change our oldest every 3-4 hours as she was a heavy wetter but the little one can go a lot longer if necessary. Didn't have to buy a single nappy for baby #2 and when she's done we will probably get 25-50% of our costs back by selling them on. You have probably negated all the environmental and cost benefits by choosing totally the wrong system I'm afraid. Please don't tarnish cloth nappies because of your choice - if you invest in some modern fitted nappies now you will probably still save money as well as being more environmentally friendly and vastly improving your experience.

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  5. Mmmm...I used disposable diapers on my daughter until she was six months old. We had been battling a rash that turned into a full blown chemical peel for about two months. We tried every cream and ointment on the market. Even used a $100 pharmacy compounded steroid ointment. In desperation I purchased half a dozen pocket diapers. Within three days of making the switch (and yes, a lot of laundry, six aren't enough), my daughter's rash was almost entirely gone. As soon as I had her in cloth full time (later that week), her rash completely disappeared. My husband thought I was crazy and would sneak a disposable diaper on our daughter occasionally. She got a rash immediately, every time. Something about those nasty chemicals, huh?!?

    I would like to point out that I never used a diaper service. My daughter used to have a "blow out" at least one a week in disposables. It often meant having to change her clothes, my clothes and anything else she touched. I only ever used the top name brand diapers, so it wasn't a cheap diaper issue. I found that I did LESS laundry after switching to cloth. What a relief! I actually never had a blow-out once switching to cloth. Never. My nursery also smelled a lot less after I made the switch. Oh what a difference not to have that chemical smell, "covered up" by more chemicals in the room.

    While my daughter was seven months old I started watching another little girl five days a week. It had only been a month, but man alive did I notice the advantages to cloth every time I changed that little girl. There were many occasions that she would arrive to my home with a rash, I'd put her into my daughter's cloth diapers for the day and by the time she was picked up, she rash would have faded. The mom didn't mind and would have switched, but the dad was very stubborn...even though he didn't do any of the diaper changes. Silly man. Sigh.

    The chemicals in disposables are enough reason for me to steer clear and stick with cloth.

    Now I will give you that having a heavy wetter can be a bit of an issue. I encourage you to try hemp, bamboo and microfiber terry or a combination of them. When my daughter hit 12 months her bladder went through a growth spurt. Bamboo, hemp and five ply microfiber terry were the only pocket diaper stuffers that would hold her.

    May I offer you another suggestion? Elimination communication. Did you know that the U.S. is one of the only countries where parents ignore their child's cues? Think about it. You know when your little man is hungry, tired, sleepy or sick and you do something about it. Why do we ignore when they have to go to the bathroom? Later we have to undo all our "bathroom ignorance training" (just made that up, please excuse) and expect two or three year olds to use the potty.

    My daughter knew when she had to go at 12 months. I ignored her, because all the data I got was from disposable diapering companies that said it was impossible to learn how to use the potty until 18 months to two years old. Fortunately my daughter's insistence won out and she started using the potty at 14 months. We were done with diapers (except at night) by the time she was 18 months old.

    So, give cloth another go. Check out one of the many fabulous fitted or pocket style diapers. Prefolds make great stuffers, but they can be a little more work and don't have the elastic to help contain leaks. I used my prefolds as stuffers until I switched to hemp and bamboo stuffers. Later I used the plain old prefolds when we were potty learning. They are a fabulous work horse diaper, but not best for every kid.

    Hope that helped!

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    1. I very much agree with you! Also look up videos on how to properly put on cloth diapers. They are a bit diffrent ttan disposables. As for changing tthe ssiehera maybe try ONE SIZE. ONE SIZE in 3 to 4 diffrent sizes for your child. Essentially you will need that ONE SIZE ddiaper til baby is ready to potty.

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  6. We have used cloth with my son is almost two and he never had issues with mobility. I will admit his car seat snaps easier when he is in a disposable. We use the all in two system and far less leaks than with refolds. It's more expensive but works better

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  7. I think you missed the whole point in elementary school buddy !! "It's the little things we do that make a change.". I suppose we should tell our kids to go ahead and leave the water running while they brush their teeth because compared to how much water is waisted what will our little bit matter. I guess most of the world has no dedication no hope too bad.

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  8. I have to say i DISAGREE w everything you wrote about cloth diapers. I have 11 different kinds and NONE of them leak, they all "eisk away the pee so its not on ur childs skin. I dont know which ones
    U have used but it sounds like u didnt give it a positive good try!! Thats why there are so many people that use sposies " disposablea" is out of dhear laziness. It takes 300 or more years for a sposie too compost in a land fill! Sleep on that. Good luck to you ! And i feel soo sorry for the children that have to wear sposies w 74 different chemicals in them right next to there precious baby skin!

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  9. Hi guys, Am digging out this old topic cause am desperate to get help. My daughter is using cloth nappies for 3 mnths now. She has started nursery, sadly, at 6 mnts old and after 2 weeks the nursery teacher, in front of her 2 co-workers, complained about the cloth nappies, made me feel very bad mother saying her bum is all red, she cannot sit like other babies because the cloth is restricting her from doing that and that it's hard on her skin and, well, all were giving me looks 'how can I treat the poor baby like this'...perhaps she's right, she cannot freely move or sit on her own, and her bum does get red sometimes. Please help me somebody find solution to that. Perhaps I could be doing somth differently...really don't want to give up on them. thanks

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    1. Sounds like ammonia burn and the diapers need to be stripped.

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    2. It could also be detergent build up, so strip up.

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    3. Check out "Fluff love and cd science" on facebook

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    4. Also look up Nicki's Diapers on Facebook and online nickisdiapers..om
      Tell them your washing routine what type of washer you have and they will be able to help you. Sometimes not using the right soap or the right washing settings can hurt the diaper but once you get your routine down its a breeze and your child's bum should get better

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  10. It's really to bad that you were never taught How to cloth diaper your child. For what that Service was charging, in that first 3 months you could have bought all the diapers and rubber pants you needed to keep 5 kids diapered well into their teens. And... They wouldn't have leaked. You call yourself a journalist... Do The Research... Learn How to Fold a Flat Diaper ... That includes real diaper pins, water proof pants. You'll need an expert... A ped nurse around 60 or 70 years old. I cloth diapered 7 kids and they never leaked and I only needed to buy extra diapers when the twins came. Real diapers are a Lost Art... You deserve the paper crap and your grand kids will have to figure out what to do.with them.

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    1. Yeah! Preach it! This article is sad and sounds like it was written by somebody who works for the (disgusting) disposable diaper industry! How much do you think the landfills can handle, guy??

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    2. rubber pants are the original covers. they are now most commonly made out of PKU which is a breathable material and fasten like a diaper instead of being pulled up like pants.

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  11. I found this article very interesting as we are debating switching to disposables as well. Most websites pro-cloth calculate the cost of disposable diapers at 2-2 1/2 times the cost per diapers of the big package of Luvs I just purchased through the Amazon Mom program for 12 cents a diaper. We tried the g diapers when our daughter was younger. The newborn size are constructed different than the other sizes and were beyond terrible. The small size works pretty well until she was about 5 months and outgrowing them. They did start to leak pretty often as she got older and they also gave her some diaper rash where the liner touched her skin. I have been using pocket diapers I purchased for around $3 a diaper (knock-off brand shipped from China) . . . but after using them solely for several months I have found that it is VERY difficult to keep them smelling fresh and they leak in less than an hour SO OFTEN. I put 4 inserts in at night, experimenting with various inserts, including a couple GroVia ones, and almost every morning she has soaked through her layers of pjs and smelling an awful lot like sour urine. I am rather tired of her onesie needing changed with nearly every diaper change (because it is rarely completely dry!) even when I change her diaper every 2 hours or less. Maybe she is just a heavy wetter or maybe I got the quality of diapers I paid for, but we need to either invest in better quality cloth diapers or coupon and go with disposables. I calculate that if I buy in bulk when I can get the price to 12 cents a diaper, I will spend approx $25-30 dollars/month. . . roughly a little over $100 every 4 months. (I plan to continue using cloth wipes and diluted California Baby diaper wash spray).) Bumgenius, even on clearance and in bulk, would cost me $400 for 24. $400 dollars would cover at a year to 16 months in disposables, so long as I coupon wisely . . .

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    1. One thing with cloth diapers you get what you pay for. If you buy China cheapies ( cheap diapers) they will..ost likely not work as well. Not saying you have to buy expensive cloth diapers like Smart Bottoms (20- 30 bucks a piece but they are rather adorable). Nicki' s Diapers have some very good diapers. Some are in expensive like ccovers 10 bucks but you have to bby inserts which is not bad because you can build your diaper aan aa lo y as your diaper does not have poop you can reuse that cover and put a new insert....an you do that with disposables?

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  12. You have OBVIOUSLY not cloth diapered properly.
    CHANGING:
    Yes, you change ALOT of diapers, and HOLY COW I'm sorry you have to pay a little more attention to your child than you would normally have to, but seriously, if you agree to put on an adult diaper and pee repeatedly in it (for possibly over 12 hours) than this should knock this reason for not using them out of the water. I get INFURIATED by diaper commercials that suggest "12 hour protection". Who the heck is leaving their babies in soiled diapers for 12 hours!!! They are officially UNFIT to be parents, GROSS!
    FIT:
    It sounds as if you had diapers that didn't fit properly and/or you were folding them incorrectly. So let's not judge the fit of diapers based on your stupidity to learn what is best for your child's body shape.... but then again, you also want to have the options of not changing them for 12 hours so thinking you would take the time to do that.
    TRAVELING:
    Car seats, strollers, and other safety restraints do not change based on a child's diaper. If anything, a cloth diaper which is a little bulkier, would raise the child higher, and if that 1/2 - 1 centimeter hight difference changes the fit of their restraint, it is possible that there is something wrong with your restraint. Think about going to a Car Seat Check sometime. But that takes a little extra time too...
    Traveling is unrestricted when cloth diapering. Have you tried maybe a bamboo All-in-One? Or a Micro-Fleece Pocket Diaper? These are great for over night and I'm assuming you wouldn't be traveling anywhere over 8 to 10 hours without changing your child....or are you!!?!?!?!?
    DAYCARE:
    Lots of Daycares are more than willing to cloth diaper your child. If they are willing to put a poopy pair of underwear and a peed-in pair of pants in a Kroger bag for you at the end of the day for a Toddler, then putting a cloth diaper in a completely closed, zipper, water-proof wet-bag should be a no brainer.
    WALKING:
    My child that I cloth diapered learned to walk more quickly than my child I didn't. Thus, not being able to move is, well, false.
    COST:
    NOT THAT HUGE?!?!?!?!?!? WHAT!?!?!?!?!? Did you do ANY research!?!?!?!?!? The average savings is about $2500 - $4000 PER KID!!! You can save that with each child! That's including energy for washing, detergent, a laundry service if you choose to do that. The cost savings is IMMENSE! A package of diapers cost on average $20 every 2-3 weeks. That's the average cost of one cloth diaper that will last you the whole time you diaper. With the one size fits all diapers you can snap them up from a newborn to a 30+ lbs child.
    POOP - EEW.
    Once again, they have diaper services that if you choose to use, will still save you money!

    I don't feel as if you have #1 Cloth diapered properly #2 Did any resesarch before you wrote this #3 Tried to get help when your diapers failed you.

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    1. OMG, a package of disposables lasts 2 to 3 weeks full time? I don't think so. We use disposables only for our baby sitter (she is really freaked out by cloth) and we go through a pack a month. That's a pack a month for just a couple of hours each day.

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    2. Wtf is wrong with you people. Do you even hear yourselves. The guy was just giving hi experience. My goodness y'all need to chill. Lady why so hostile? Dang. Maybe he could have explored other avenues but: his kid.his experience. his decision. Looks like you need to explore taking a chill. I thought the resurgence of cloth diapers was at least in part about being open minded to try something different and learning from other parents experiences. But obviously to this lady it's about some other whole deal. This lady was being plain mean for no reason. If you can't offer good advice or add to the conversation in any real productive non mean way the buzz off. I think parents should try thing until they find what is right for their baby and their family. And yes their planet. However if that sweet baby is happy and thriving then it's nobody's place to question. What a mean ugly spirited bunch of remarks from the poster to whom I'm replying. I hope the baby Joel is thriving no matter how his bottom is covered

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    3. I totally agree with you!! I'm thinking the mean-spirited responses might be due to dealing with a few cloth diapers too much! ;) I happen to be a grandma of seven and had four of my own... I know, now I will hear from everyone about overpopulation. We lived way far away from civilization when our kids were little and I even thought I was being very helpful to our environment by helping out some of our neighbors who were "roughing it" more than us by not have running water and/or electricity, by washing, drying and folding cloth diapers for them too. But it sure didn't make me as crabby as some of the parents who replied to this poor dad who was simply sharing 'his' experience! Maybe those folks should just take a (what did they call people who use disposables?) sposie vaca for a few days and chill out. Love and patience (with each other too!) is more important that what we put on our little guys' bottoms!

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  13. It's really interesting to see the conversation that has taken place. The "cloth or else" individuals are very quick to insult, and say that you aren't diapering correctly, while other parents who are sick of the woes of cloth are asking for advice.
    There's something I've wondered about cloth diapers, and have researched on them. After a while there is a lingering ammonia smell. It's unpleasant, and is very difficult to just do a quick rinse. You could do stripping, but that's several washes using very hot water, and then adding detergent. There are several brands of soap that can be used, but again that's soaking the diapers and then washing them. How can you reduce the use of water in order to keep the diapers clean? If you don't clean them well your child is at risk of ammonia burn.

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    1. That's what cracks me up: people presenting a pro-cloth diaper argument are VERY quick to point fingers at dioxin in disposables and how that causes rashes (a fair enough argument) but will completely ignore ammonia burns in cloths (as stated above) which can cause rashes as well. My opinion: people should just pick their poison and not judge other people for a decision that LITERALLY means sh!t.

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    2. My son is nearly two and a half and has never had "ammonia burn". We keep our diapers clean. The only rashes he has gotten is either from diarrhea when he's sick, and the first month, when we had to put him in preemie size disposables (20+ a freaking day), because we bought cloth in anticipation of a full size full term baby.

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    3. If people would wash their diapers RIGHT and kept them CLEAN they would NEVER have ammonia problems. Besides, that even isnt the way to start over when you have an ammonia problem.

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  14. not to mention the fact that eventually all cloth diapers are made with things that don't break down and end up in landfills too.

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    1. Actually there's a huge market for reselling nappies. Those that are well made can be used for multiple children. Before anyone says that this is unsanitary, then I say get a grip. They are thoroughly washed and can be done so with anti bad detergent if chosen. I am a bit of a germ-a-phob., but you have to put it in perspective and realise that we come in to contact unwillingly with other people's germs constantly. Ever eaten out? Well unless you're in the habit of taking your own cutlery and dinnerware then you're using it after someone else. You don't know how slap dash they are in the kitchen with cleaning. They're not all sterilised that's for sure.
      I've cloth diapered my 8 month old since birth and had problems early on but persisted and tried different brands / types. It was disheartening but I researched and spoke to online companies for advice. They will even admit that it is there is so much variety it can be overwhelming. I find it sad that the majority want the convenience option first and foremost and don't even consider cloth and rather than just say they can't be bothered, try to find all these bad points against cloth. I don't think this article has a place at all as he has an extremely limited experience and it could put people off trying it at all.

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  15. We use both cloth and disposable.

    #1 is mostly dependent on your kid, but we always use disposable at night because I don't want to change the baby 4-5 times at night. We do daytime changes every 2-3hrs in cloth.

    #2 has got to be a size issue. I've yet to find a disposable diaper that can match my cloth for containment purposes.

    I agree wholeheartedly with numbers 3, 4, and 5.

    #6 I have no experience on this front, but I've heard that some daycares will let you work it out. Even so, that means work for you in finding a cloth friendly daycare.

    #7 I didn't start cloth diapering with my first till he was a year. But with my now 7mth old, this has started to concern me. He definitely rolls and scoots better in disposables. He hasn't started crawling yet, which isn't necessarily concerning at this point, but I've been putting him in disposables more often to see if it helps. His brother was crawling by 6 months.

    #8 Yep. And it only gets worse once they start eating real food. I wash my own because it's considerably cheaper than a diaper service. Sometimes it's no big deal, but some days it's downright disgusting. We keep the diapers near the washer. I throw a wet towel over the bucket to contain the smell till I have enough to do a wash.

    #9 Diaper service is hurting you here, as is buying sized diapers. Go for one size diapers. I've used the same ones on both kids. Buy diapers used or on sale. I've spent about $250 for my entire stash that I've used on and off with both of my kids.

    The whole reason why I don't cloth diaper full time is numbers 3, 4, 5, and 8. I don't care what anyone says, it is not easier than disposable. That is a big fat lie, and it irritates me that people aren't more honest about how much work it is to cloth diaper. But, the work is worth it financially, and environmentally. I'm just not very disciplined in keeping up with it.

    Great post. I'm glad someone is willing to point out the cons instead of painting it like it's all rainbows and unicorns.

    ReplyDelete
  16. After doing considerable research I didn't use a diaper service because it didn't save money. So maybe you should have done some research. Also I have way less blow outs with my cloth diapering.

    Also just because disposables hold more pee should you let your kid sit in pee? Gross.

    ReplyDelete
  17. While I don't think cloth diapering should be portrayed as being "easier" than disposables I do have to say that I much prefer cloth to disposables these days. We didn't start my daughter in cloth until she was 15 months old and even starting late in the game we will save a lot of money. Of course, you can't really expect to save a ton of money when you are using a diaper service so I don't even think that's a valid argument as a I believe that many more using cloth choose to launder the diapers themselves instead of investing in a diaper service.

    Of course since we started at 15 months DD was walking so I don't have any personal experience with your "issue" with delayed milestones. However, I know many many many parents who cloth diaper don't experience this. And yes, cloth diapers are without a doubt more bulky than disposables so we just buy a size up in the pants, no big deal.

    Also, to address the fact of the "wet" feeling... that is the nature of the type of diaper you were using. If you are using prefolds or fitted diapers which don't have a stay-dry inner layer, you could simply go to your local craft shop and buy fleece and lay a piece of it in the diaper. Other types of diapers like pockets include a layer of stay-dry fabric such as microfleece or suede cloth which wicks away the wetness.

    Had you chosen to go the route of purchasing and laundering your own diapers you may have found that many of your bullet-points wouldn't have existed. In the end, cloth isn't for everyone and that's ok.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Why are 90% of the folks cloth diapering so pretentious? Choosing to cloth diaper your child doesn't make you a better person and really, you shouldn't do something for the bragging rights. The mentality of the cloth diapering community, if you will, is a total turn off.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Wow. 90% of that info is soooo off. Just sayin.

    ReplyDelete
  20. You should really try more cloth options before saying that cloth diapering isn't easier. I've been cloth diapering for 3+ years (2 kids) and would never go back to the nasty blow outs, disgusting smell of disposables, all the chemicals, $90+ a month because my son was one of those that would cry as soon as he peed to be changed. Once you find what works for you with cloth, its a breeze. We use a mixture of AI2's, fitteds and pockets. No blowouts, no leaks, no hassle. We go everywhere with our daughter in cloth, everything fits, she walked at 9 months... so your arguments aren't true for all children. Or even most.

    ReplyDelete
  21. The above anon reply (and this one) was posted as anon bc I'm too lazy to log in. My name is Kassi :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Wow.... how about you grow a pair before having kids? They are gross a lot and if you are to chicken to clean up poop DON'T HAVE KIDS! We did disposables for a long time, they burned our daughters behind and front constantly. Modern all in ones in cloth can hold MUCH more than disposables over night with no rash and baby being completely dry. Prefolds from a service are best for new borns anyway, and not heavy wetters like your son.

    There are downsides to cloth, though the initial investment is the worst. We spent about $60 a month on disposables and $250 or so on cloth for a decent stash. But, if you are worried about fashion on your child you have more to worry about than the cloth/disposable debate and are just being rediculous. Same goes for " not fitting in car seats". That is rediculous as well.

    I am frustrated that so many fathers are taking the "ewww, it's gross" approach to their kids these days. At least until they are scho age then they are interesting. I love playing with my 17 month old daughter and yes changing her isn't always pleasant, but neither was her constant rash in disposables.

    If you are man enough, try an all in one and see the diifference. You don't have to cloth diaper all the time, but don't excuses to get out of them. Just say you don't liike them.

    I'll stop now.

    From a proud to cloth diaper dad.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I have to say I wholeheartedly disagree.
    #1 - changing often.
    Babies SHOULD be changed often. There is no reason to have your son sit in his own urine and feces once you know it's in there.
    As for "whisking," diapers with a stay-dry layer WICK moisture away from baby's skin. We do not use prefolds/flats and covers but instead opt for one-size pocket diapers. The inside layer is fleece or minky material, with a waterproof outer (the absorbant insert goes in the "pocket" between).

    #2 - leaking.
    Again, you need to try something else. Either your prefolds/flats aren't folded or put on properly, or your covers aren't the right fit. Pocket diapers, all-in-ones, all-in-twos, and fitteds with covers are all options that simplify fit and are easier to keep from leaking. And again, if you know your son is urinating that often, you still should change him often, regardless of how much a chemical-laden disposable can contain.
    #3 - clothing
    I've never had an issue with my son's bottom fitting into clothes. The fact that you opted for prefolds & covers could very well be the culprit; they are probably the least trim option.

    #4 - fitting in restraints.
    See #3

    #5 - travel
    I'm able to easily fit ten or so pocket diapers in a regularly-sized diaper bag along with all our other necessities, and they are put onto baby exactly as you would put on a disposable, so it isn't any more complicated. We have a travel wetbag with a hidden waterproof PUL layer and zip closure, so they're easy to get home.

    #6 - daycare issues
    This I really can't touch on; I'm a work at home mom.

    #7 - mobility
    Again, prefolds are bulky in comparison to other options. That said, if folded properly they shouldn't be nearly bulky enough to hinder movement.

    #8 - dirties
    First off, untreated human waste simply doesn't belong in a landfill. With cloth, I use a diaper sprayer to spray solids into the toilet, and then it's into the wetbag until wash time. A cold rinse cycle followed by a hot wash and a few extra rinses (to ensure there's no lingering detergent), and they are fresh, clean, and non-smelly.

    #9 - cost
    A diaper service is undoubtedly the most expensive route you can take in cloth diapering. Also, other types of cloth diapers come with "one-size" options, which have rows of snaps to adjust the rise and tabs so they fit baby until potty training. So, investing in one set of diapers becomes the final cost, not an ongoing expense.

    *environmentally - environmentally-friendly cloth diapers come in all sorts of natural materials. Disposables include chemicals and plastics that sit in landfills, not to mention the untreated human waste.

    ReplyDelete
  24. If you use a good cloth diaper (not a prefold from a service) it will have a moisture wicking inner that will pull the moisture away from the skin. And as far as changing more ofter, I don't know about you, but just because a disposable can hold 4 gallons of pee doesn't mean you should leave it on that long. Would you want to sit around for 3 hours in a Depends that is full of pee? I changed my babies every time they peed whether they were in a disposable or a cloth diaper.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I have cloth diapered two kiddos, I disposable diapered my oldest. Hands down, cloth was/is so much better (for us). Easier, healthier and more cost friendly. We used different types though, not confined to what a service offered. So sorry your experience with cloth was so bad, I can't imagine going back to disposable diapers!

    ReplyDelete
  26. I also cloth diaper and feel bad that you had a bad experience with the diaper device diapers. I think you'd find if you looked for another cloth alternative that you could find something that would work better for your family. I've clothed with 4 children and didn't have the issues you have. And another note. Please no one leave your child sitting in pee filled chemical gel just because it isn't spraying out the sides. Babies should be changed after they potty

    ReplyDelete
  27. This surprises me. I cloth diaper and none of these things are really true for me. I bought all mine because a little extra laundry is not that big of a deal to me. My baby goes far longer in between changes and doesn't even seem to mind, I usually just realize he hasn't been changed in hours and do it myself. No crying or fussing from him. The cost savings is HUGE. (But I don't use a diaper service..) His clothes fit, he can get into carseats, swings, bouncers, you name it. Traveling is not a hassle as the most I've changed him on a public outing was once. And honestly I guess the dirty diaper issue is something personal for you. I have a diaper sprayer and I just spray the poop off and put the diaper in a pail. Its really not much more of a big deal than changing a disposable. What will you do when your kid wets the bed? Throw the sheet away? No, you just deal with it. Oh and my son rolled over at 5 weeks, in a cloth diaper!

    I really think this article should come with a label that this is your personal experience and not a general "fact" list.

    ReplyDelete
  28. What I am appalled at, more than anything, is the off-putting 'holier than thou' attitude of many of the pro-cloth diapering replies!! As a fellow cloth-diaperer and often crunchy mama, I'm embarrassed by these replies completely devoid of compassion. If I still had to change my baby as often as SIX times in less than an hour at 3 months, I doubt very much I would've made it that long using cloth. Where are they reading that you want to leave your baby in his soiled diapers for hours on end?? Getting exasperated (and rightly so) by your heavy wetter's frequent discomfort in his cloth diapers does not mean you're looking to find a way to NOT change him for 12 hours! Jeez, people! Give the man a break! How many guys do YOU know that were willing to even CONSIDER using cloth diapers, let alone start out with the same gung-ho attitude this guy had! This man is not the enemy, he is just writing about HIS OWN personal experience with cloth diapers! It's a BLOG post, does a blog post really need the caveat that "this is his own personal experience"??

    I actually find myself in a very similar boat to you, Captain Critic, in that I wanted to cloth diaper from the beginning and have done so, also with a service, for more than 5 months now. I, too, feel that cloth diapering has many of the same day to day drawbacks, and have only been keeping the service because I feel guilty tossing disposables in the trash too often. I also find I have way more poop on clothing episodes using a prefold with a diaper cover (I've tried several different highly rated brands and several different folds) than I do using disposables (which I've begun using more often at night, never had any rash issues) and the constant hand washing of the diaper covers when I could be spending that time playing with my daughter is a real drag.

    And I'd say for sure, at least in our experience, that the cloth diapers do indeed hinder our child's movement/flexibility, something I am not too keen on doing right in the middle of her learning to scoot and crawl around. And it is for sure frustrating to not be able to use any of the bottoms that come with the clothes I buy her. If I buy up a size, the top part hangs off of her. I wish services would offer the cloth fitteds or All in 2s, because it sounds like they might offer a less bulky and better, less prone to poopsplosions fit, but at this point having to invest hundreds of dollars on a whole new stash of different cloth diapers and trying to find the time to do all that extra laundry just isn't feasible for my situation. I plan on starting EC as soon as she can sit up on her own, anyway, so hopefully will be diaper free in the not too distant future.

    Anyway, I WISH I had known all this 5 months ago, and that's why I'm glad you took the time to write this post (that I obviously wish I had found earlier). Like in one of the few reasonable replies above, I do find the prevailing crunchy attitude of 'cloth diapering is all unicorns and rainbows' to be doing those of us who are genuinely trying to do 'the right thing' a disservice. Just as NO diaper is truly a one size fits all, neither will all our cloth diapering experiences be the same. Perhaps a parent-to-be contemplating using a prefold diaper service might instead invest that money in trying out some All in 1 or All in 2 diapers first. I sure wish I had.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I'm not sure about the mobility thing. Depends on the cloth diaper I guess. My daughter was in disposables and she was mobile later than my son who is currently being cloth diapered. She had more issues sitting up and rolling with disposables. Where as my son who was 2 months preemie is already sitting, crawling and rolling much earlier and easier than she did. I use pockets and go threw 6-8 diapers in 24 hours. Never had a leak and I've been using since he got out of the nicu. So 7 months. I find it easier actually cause I don't take the garbage out as much, zero smell around my home, and its just another load of laundry. Plus never once have I had a rash. Pocket diaps are super easy. Very convenient depending on the system.vSometimes baby's pee a lot. Seems like yours did for sure. Sometimes cloth doesn't work for some little ones and it for sure depends on the busyness of the parents. I never had an issue finding time for cloth personally. I am so happy i don't have to run to the store lol. Sometimes they don't fit into peoples schedules and sometimes it can be hard to fit it in. It took me a bit in the beginning. But now I love it. Its become so fun cause of how cute and easy they are now. They have really evolved. Thanks for your blog. Very interesting read.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I cloth diaper, and I think it's a pain. Definitely less convenient and a steeper learning curve, especially in the beginning with wash routine. My second child was also a frequent heavy wetter, and was very bothered by wetness. I had to change him all the time until finally I cut up a Carter's fleece blanket and lined the diaper with it. Amazing, he could finally go for an hour or two without fussing about his diaper.
    As for the movement, I think this is a concern for mostly first time parents, as you will realize that sooner or later your kids will get there, big cloth butt or not.

    ReplyDelete
  31. There are hybrid diapers now, as far as traveling/washing/bulk goes; where you use disposable pads in the diaper instead of cloth. As far as whisking away wetness... cloth diapers CAN do this. But you must use microfleece diapers such as Fuzzibuns. I can agree to the learning curve... I should have stuck with Gdiapers, but no one acted like they WANTED to change my son's diaper, so when he grew out of the size we had, I used prefolds and a diaper cover, which apparently only I could understand, I find out after he's potty trained everyone would have liked to change him but didn't know how. *rolls eyes*

    Anyway, it can be a bit of a pain, and more of a pai depending on the method you use... Our next child I'm using Gdiapers. All the way.

    Additionally, disposables are nasty. They contain dioxins from being bleached, are more harmful to the environment(use more water to manufacture), and you're not even SUPPOSED to throw them away anyway. It says on the package to wash off poop, because you are NOT supposed to put a poopy diaper in the landfill. ..If you're supposed to wash off a disposable anyway, why not just use cloth? I would never use any other absorbent material but cotton, or wool. It's all natural, and if you use flats or prefolds, MUCH cheaper. They NEED to feel wet. They potty train faster. Disposables are confusing. They can pee, and pee, and pee, and never feel it, and then all of a sudden, a couple years later, you're struggling to potty train them because they lost the concept of what feeling wet feels like. We EC'd(Elimination Communication) with our son and he was in underwear at 13 months, but still. I don't think EC would have been nearly as effective if we used disposables.

    There's also a load of chemicals in disposables that are right next to your baby's skin.

    As far as the ability to move.. you may have me there. My son crawled at 10 1/2 months, walked at 17 1/2 months. But that's still within the normal range of doing those things anyway, so I really have no complaints.

    ReplyDelete
  32. "I am very happy to read your articles it’s very useful for me,
    and I am completely satisfied with your website.
    All comments and articles are very useful and very good.
    Your blog is very attention-grabbing. I am loving all of the in.
    turn you are sharing with each one!….

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hi! What's your opinion on who are your blog's common subscribers?

    ReplyDelete
  34. That's very nice tips ...Baby skin is very sensitive. Every parents should take care of their baby skin specially from diaper rashes.Thanks for sharing such a useful tips.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Honestly I think your reasons are horrible and based on little experience. Why do you want your child to wear so much pee? I WANT to know when my child has wet so I can change her. I WANT her to understand the feeling and her bodily functions, cause and effect. I purposely use a fitted system so I can tell immediately when she needs a change. I never have leaks since tweaking my system just a bot to find what's best for us. Never has she had a rash either. It's far better for her health and bodily awareness.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Wow! A lot of holier-than-thou cloth users out there! Thanks for an honest article. I use a diaper service which has great fitted/micro fleece diapers and I have purchased my own covers, based on mostly my own research. We chose this for mostly environmental reasons, though we use disposables too.

    Here's the truth: I can't use them all the time, as my son is also a heavy-wetter. I feel your pain, as I must change every 30 mins to keep him happy. I can't imagine changing more often, as you did, and having time for anything else in the day. Seriously. I find myself waiting around the house a lot because I know I need to do another diaper change soon. I'm certain the cloth diaper gods out there will blame me for not doing enough research(even though I spent weeks researching, and have tried many styles/products).
    Background: we only recently changed to cloth, as my son was a NICU baby . . . Long story, but we used disposables for that, and other reasons, until he was a year. He is 15 months. I am trying to make a go of the cloth, but no matter how many inserts, or type of diaper/materials we've tried, he is always wet. He has never acted so pissed off, but we keep trying. Here's the thing; I refuse to compromise his sleep, and put him in night time disposables, which I still change every 3-4 hours. He never had a diaper rash until we switched to cloth; we are constantly fighting this, but he is sensitive to the dampness of the microfiber. Anyway, I don't blame you for giving up for now. I know changing every 30 mins is hard for us (especially with a toddler who wants to run away from every diaper change). Perhaps you'll try again when your baby is older, perhaps not- but it's your choice! For all those replying that you leave your baby in wet diapers for too long, they clearly don't comprehend what it's like to have a really heavy-wetter! If we used cloth at the same age, we would have given up too! By the way, we have more poopy blowouts with cloth, but that is just our experience; everyone is different. To each his/her own! Best of luck.

    ReplyDelete
  37. pros:
    disposables are made out of chemicals.
    Less rashes
    if you make the investment on baby 1, baby 2 is essentially free
    check ebay, the resale is great
    one size fits all available (2 kids? no problem, grab 5 of the same diapers, no separate sizes)
    less baggage. when laundry is available, we only pack 10 diapers (2kids) for weekends and vacation


    ReplyDelete
  38. your baby is HUGE maybe thats why he doesnt fit in high chairs, car seats, and he cant move. sorry but youre wrong

    ReplyDelete
  39. You are severely misinformed and totally wrong. it sounds like you did not know how to use a cloth diaper.

    ReplyDelete
  40. We used cloth on all 4 of ours. Also used disposables for traveling. 2 of ours suffered with bedwetting and I continued to use cloth on them until they outgrew it around age 8 or 9. There are many different styles and types of cloth diapers out there today and this includes larger ones for bedwetters also there a a bigger variety of covers, everything from wool to pul to plastic pants. It' a matter of choice or preference. If I had it to do over again I would still choose cloth as it is reusable and recyclable.
    Sign Me
    From Diapers to Dustcloths

    ReplyDelete
  41. I just haven't found this to be true at all, as a cloth diaper using mama. I wouldn't do a diaper service because I think they tend to be the most expensive option, but also have the worst kinds of diapers. I did some research before having a child and chose to buy pocket diapers and all-in-ones. They're pretty trim, and my daughter's clothes fit just fine. They're also economical because of resale value.

    Infant car seats are usually outgrown by height before weight, and my daughter was out of her infant car seat and into the convertible well before 19 lbs, personally. Nothing to do with cloth diapers -- I hate seeing big babies squished into infant car seats, and it sounds like your son may have outgrown his despite the weight requirement.

    We have no blow-outs in cloth diapers, but had them all the time in disposables. We also had diaper rash in disposables, but not in cloth. Again, everyone's mileage will vary, I'm sure, but I think crappy diaper service diapers were your undoing here, not cloth diapers in general. I hope your very particular experience doesn't dissuade people from choosing an option that might have worked better for you if you'd done a bit more research and sough some help from more experienced cloth diaper users. Nothing wrong with disposables, either, but most of this is just not good information.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If someone is having blowouts with cloth, I would suggest they try a different fold. I do an origami fold and use a snappi, and not even a fart can escape.

      Delete
  42. I am a bit shocked at the ugliness of many responses.
    I have three children, and run a small daycare. I accept cloth diapered infants, although I like disposable diapers for my own kids.
    Un-medicated delivery vs epidural
    Breast milk vs formula
    Cloth diapers vs disposable
    Home school vs public vs private
    Stay home with our children vs work outside the home
    There are many personal choices we make as parents. We choose which works best for our child, our lifestyle, our income, our beliefs.
    If you believe cloth diapers are best, use them.
    Prefer disposables? Use them.
    A diaper choice doesn't make you a good/bad parent.
    A child can be safe, happy, healthy in either one. Mission accomplished.

    ReplyDelete
  43. My experience from down under. Half my cloth (actual squares) were those my mum used on my sister and I. Half were gifts - in lovely bright colours (hence would have had some chemical dyes). I used snappies and nappy pins. I (and the Dad) washed them all ourselves. We used only cold water as my mum told me hot water would stain them. We tipped poops into the toilet straight from the nappy; soaked them; scrubbed them.Then washed them with the soaked wet ones. All line dried or on hanging racks in winter. Same nappies for second baby. As far as mobility goes both our babies had time each day to move freely and our son crawled @ 9mnths & walked @ 1 yr. Our daughter crawled @ 9 mnths, walked at 10 m. As far as clothes fitting, no expensive purchases as clothes fit though I did get retro clothes which may have been designed when cloth was more common + both our kids were slim waisted. No problems w high chairs, car seats etc. Diidn't use daycare at all.
    Didn't mind the wetness side of things. I felt the early toilet training - 2 yrs & 18 months was partly due to fact they felt the wetness & temp. discomfort from the cloth nappies close to when they urinated. At 1 year we''d tell our son to wee in his pottie each morning & he'd pull down his own nappy to do so. I noticed both kids did a large wee during their morning feed - 4am - 6am;fatter being dry for 6+hrs. So I started to lean them over the potty then and fit. That way It was one less nappy and then it grew from their to telling them to go to their potty themselves in the morning. They could walk over to their potty themselves from our low, futon bed where we co-slept. We travelled locally & more distantly with ease. Small backpack & a few plastic bags for nappy storage for short trips. For long trips, (Tasmania for 7 weeks with a one year old, or blue mountains & Sydney with a ten-month old we used a twin set of sealed buckets which swooshed as we drove & washed nappies in laundromats. If our kids got nappy rash we used a barrier cream + more time out in the air. I think if you make a decision to be environmentally responsible there are multiple ways to do so. However to say cloth nappies aren't ecological you would HAVE to be doing it quite differently to how I did. And cheap!!!!!!! Just detergent & electricity for the washing machine.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Sorry about typos - mainly from getting the text size down on an iPhone!
    It should say 'after being dry for 6+hrs' so I leaned them over the potty to wee during the start of their first feed.

    Also not all babies hold their wee in overnight in this way. Many do but it is determined partly by genetics as per the bladder sphincters response under pressure - retain OR release.

    I really think cloth nappies are great and worth pursuing & can be very ecological, more so than the most Eco nappies however it all depends HOW you do it so may be best not to bother if you think you're approach is more or less as environmentally unsound as plastic nappies. In that case just go for the best Eco plastic nappies you can get & try and get your kids out of them asap.

    ReplyDelete
  45. hi I'm using this site for some sources for my school project- should we use disposable diapers?- and i have to site it in bibliographical mla format, and i cant find who published this site and when it was published could you please help me or tell me where i can find it?

    ReplyDelete
  46. I am very happy to read your articles it’s very useful for me, 
    and I am completely satisfied with your website. 
    All comments and articles are very useful and very good.
    Your blog is very attention-grabbing. I am loving all of the in.
    turn you are sharing with each one!….

    ReplyDelete
  47. Wow, I use cloth on my child. But I must say cloth diapering people seem really mean in this blog. Poor guy got a nwe one from all the comments. So sorry.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I used a cloth diaper service when my twins were born and it was more hassle than it was worth. I tried a couple of all-in-one cloth diapers from friends and settled on Bumgenius Freetimes. they are awesome. I've also looked at half a dozen daycares in my area (upstate NY, so not NYC) before we settled on one and all of them took cloth-diapered babies, so I think it's mostly a myth or something that used to happen (not taking cloth diapered babies) that doesn't happen much any more.

    I love my AIOs (all in ones). They are one sized and fit babies from 8lbs to 35lbs so they will last until they are potty trained. I don't think you really gave cloth diapering a fair shot but you are of course entitled to do whatever you'd like for your baby. I wish you would have tried a little harder though.

    ReplyDelete
  49. I disagree entirely. It is possible that the diapers you had were ill fitting for your child. We have had a few models of diapers and over time they do all fit a little different. We have probably had 2 poo escapes in cloth, and that was when she was a newborn. The rare disposables we have used are MUCH more likely to leak in our experience. We spent about $200 and got a few types of diapers and have been very pleased. We had a few newborn size diapers, and once baby grew out of them we were able to resell them. This was great. After that we have used one sized adjustable covers and couldn't be happier. They wash great, and have saved us tons of money. Check my blog if you are interested in more... http://itzybellababy.blogspot.com/search/label/cloth%20diapers

    ReplyDelete
  50. I am very happy to read your articles it’s very useful for me, 
    and I am completely satisfied with your website. 
    All comments and articles are very useful and very good.
    Your blog is very attention-grabbing. I am loving all of the in.
    turn you are sharing with each one!….

    ReplyDelete
  51. I am very happy to read your articles it’s very useful for me, 
    and I am completely satisfied with your website. 
    All comments and articles are very useful and very good.
    Your blog is very attention-grabbing. I am loving all of the in.
    turn you are sharing with each one!….

    ReplyDelete
  52. We also use both. We use disposables for most outings and night time when our child ends up sleeping in our bed a few hours. (And also because I'm exhausted during night changes and disposables are quicker)

    What I especially like about reusables is the money I save. I received most covers as gifts, I have about eight covers. I bought the cloth myself, I have two dozen, a total of forty dollars spent there. Good for 6lbs till 15 lbs. I've never had one leak yet, even for feces. Though I'm a stay at home mom and can change them as soon as baby poops. Sometimes I make the mistake of changing him before he's done, or he starts to poo while I'm changing a wet one. These times I can go through three to four diapers in one changing, because he just keeps going. These are the times I'm so grateful that I'm using reusables.

    When I see I only have ten disposables left, and I don't need to go buy more for still another three days, I'm grateful for reusables.

    Getting everything I needed for reusables only cost about 80-100. Yes, including what family members bought me. Just one box of disposables is 20, and would only last a week!

    Though I use both, I'm happy with all the money I save, and emergency trips to the store I don't have to do, while using cloth.

    And whenever I don't feel like doing the extra effort to save the money, (which is out of character for me) I can use disposables quite easily.

    ReplyDelete
  53. This is a great article. I’ve read in many
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    ReplyDelete
  54. This article is way off base for the rest of the cloth diapering world. If you are only using one kind of diaper system , you might have those feelings. My baby is cloth diapered and he has a trim butt, and fits in normal sized pants. I also have had zero leaking of poo and only a handful of times with pee. He blew out of disposables on a weekly basis when we were using disposables. And you might have a super soaker child or you are not using an absorbent enough material. We use hemp and bamboo and can go very long periods of time…. And poop is poop…You are going to have to deal with it either way.

    ReplyDelete
  55. We started cloth about 50% of the time about a month ago. We use mainly pockets with microfiber inserts. I have one all in one from bum genius that is our champion overnight diaper. My son actually seems more comfortable in them versus the disposables, especially at night. The only time we've leaked, in either, has been a fit issue, or we forgot to point him downward(that's been fun!). When I first started, I was washing on delicate and use a free and clear detergent, but then I found fluff love university and adjusted my wash routine, it's been life saving and made the diapers smell great. Our only rash has come from prune or cereal induced poops.
    I do think cloth is a lot more work, but I personally like them a lot more. The clothing fitting can be an issue sometimes, but mobility has not been. I think everyone has a different experience in any aspect of parenting they choose. I think the main reason people are taking offense to this post is misinformation that could turn someone off from cloth before they've even started or sought help. The group I'm in for fluff love, people are more than willing to help with any issues you may be having!

    ReplyDelete
  56. Hi Joel,
    Reading your article has made me so sad. We have been full time cloth diapering our son who was (10 pounds 6 Oz at birth) since he was 2 1/2 weeks.

    I fully believe that you and your wife should give cding another try and not using a diaper service and try another type of diaper. There are so many options out there. (All in Ones, All in Twos, Pockets) I couldn't imagine having to change my son 6 times an hour, that's absurd!

    I REALLY hope you give cloth diapers another try, because they are awesome, and so much cuter. If you consider it, come check out our cloth diaper group "Fluff Love & CD Science" there are tons of mama's and dads plus the wonderful admins who can help you anytime. :)

    ReplyDelete
  57. Also, I can go 3 to 4 days between washing my sons diapers and my house doesn't smell. I think your diapering service was not washing them properly, giving bad smells and poor absorbency. I hope don't sound pretentious like another poster stated, I'm just trying to help educate you, so you know you have options and cloth isn't terrible. My husband was not on board at all when we started and nownhe enjoys it and is glad we did it.

    Also we have never had an issue with our son fitting into clothes or strollers or his carseat.:)

    ReplyDelete
  58. Also, I can go 3 to 4 days between washing my sons diapers and my house doesn't smell. I think your diapering service was not washing them properly, giving bad smells and poor absorbency. I hope don't sound pretentious like another poster stated, I'm just trying to help educate you, so you know you have options and cloth isn't terrible. My husband was not on board at all when we started and nownhe enjoys it and is glad we did it.

    Also we have never had an issue with our son fitting into clothes or strollers or his carseat.:)

    ReplyDelete
  59. Hi Joel,
    Reading your article has made me so sad. We have been full time cloth diapering our son who was (10 pounds 6 Oz at birth) since he was 2 1/2 weeks.

    I fully believe that you and your wife should give cding another try and not using a diaper service and try another type of diaper. There are so many options out there. (All in Ones, All in Twos, Pockets) I couldn't imagine having to change my son 6 times an hour, that's absurd!

    I REALLY hope you give cloth diapers another try, because they are awesome, and so much cuter. If you consider it, come check out our cloth diaper group "Fluff Love & CD Science" there are tons of mama's and dads plus the wonderful admins who can help you anytime. :)

    ReplyDelete
  60. I think you mean "wicking" moisture, not "whisking".

    ReplyDelete
  61. Yikes! Looks like you guys should have done more research before you started - because nearly everything you listed here is inaccurate! I had to scroll a long way to find this comment box, so I'm not going to go back up to check your points but...

    You mean "wicking", and there are plenty of cloth diapers that DO in fact wick away the urine. I have cloth diapered both of my children now (3 years + of cloth diapering under my belt and counting) and neither of them have felt any wetness during their diaper days.

    If you were having poop explosions, then your diapers didn't fit properly. Simple. Someone should have told you about One Size diapers too, by the way. They go from newborn to toddlerhood very easily and would have saved you some money on all those covers you bought.

    As far as cost goes, normally people just buy and wash their own diapers. A diaper service is extremely expensive and not worth it at ALL. I cloth diapered my oldest child with only $100 spent. We were on a tight budget back then. I have spent more on my second child but it is not necessary. Even still I literally have saved thousands of dollars, especially since there is a market for selling even used diapers. So I can sell my entire "stash" and essentially have diapered them for free, almost.

    Washing the diapers isn't nearly as bad as you'd think. Most of the time I can simple open up a poopy diaper and just plop it into the toilet. Then I toss it in the pail. No rinsing required. And you don't have to rinse pee diapers either. On the rare occasion that it's a messy poop I do have a little sprayer hooked up on my toilet and I can simply spray it off the diaper. Takes only a few seconds and then again, it goes right in the pail. On laundry day it all just gets tipped into the washer and then voila, it's the same as any other laundry load. The only extra step you have to take is getting rid of the poop. And you already do laundry so that part shouldn't be a big deal. I'd rather do laundry than make a trip to the store, for sure.

    Travelling is also easy. So not sure what the issue is there. Just put diapers in your bag the same way you would with disposables. The only extra step is having a wet bag to bring home the dirties.

    I'm sure there are more points that I don't remember at this point without scrolling up. But as you can see, you didn't give it much of a chance and also definitely went the wrong way about it. I see that this is from 2011 so it sucks that you can't try again. Maybe with future babies? Who knows. I do urge you to look into it some more though. There is so much more out there than diaper services and pre folds (which suck, btw).

    ReplyDelete
  62. I did not finish reading this article because it seems super misinformed. I've never had leak issues with my cloth diapers. To me it seems like you just didn't have a good diaper system. I use applecheeks and paired with their bamboo inserts I have no issues! When my so has a huge poop you can see it stop where the ruffles are on the diapers. I've had several huge blowouts with disposables.
    Also, I find no issues with clothes, I mostly just use shirts instead of onsies and if I need to I can just buy one size higher in pants.
    Travelling isn't an issue and I do it frequently. I just dunk and swish any poop off and the diaper goes in a wet bag and I wash it when we get home.
    I think you should try a different diaper brand and join a Facebook group called fluff love and science to get assistance in how to properly cloth diaper.

    ReplyDelete
  63. What to post false information about something you tried and did wrong!!. You need to use a fleece liner to wick away moisture from the baby and quite frankly if my baby were in disposables I wouldn't want him sitting in chemical filled urine just so I didn't have to change him as often. As for cost saving (another thing you were doing wrong) I've spent about £250 on all my little boys nappies and the will last him until potty training, look up birth to potty cloth. I have used cloth since my son was born and I've personally washed every single load myself it costs me roughly 66p per load including water, electric and detergents, I wash twice a week hardly the end of the world. If you stored your dirty nappies correctly you wouldn't have an issue with smell, I used a large wetbag, I've never had a single smell ever wetbag are only £6 each. My stash will last me for future children too!, we plan on having 2/3 more children and I'll never have to buy another nappy by the end of having 3/4 babies in cloth I'd have saved myself thousands of pounds.

    Then factor in cloth wipes and there is another load of savings.

    You really should have researched little better before you started using cloth.

    ReplyDelete
  64. Most of your information is vastly flawed. A service is a waste of money. With a good washer and detergent, you can do it yourself. I just had a poop explosion in a sposie just now. I never have poop explosions in cloth. And i use cloth at daycare. Gasp! Most states that allow it demand they are in one piece like a pocket and all in one. I have saved so much money! Most his daycare diapers are filled with bamboo flats folded up. They work great.... Even for heavy wetters.

    Personally I have hated prefolds but I love flats and use pockets/aio for daddy and daycare. We use 2hemp inserts for night with a wool cover. It is great! All night leak proof whereas the spouse leaked.

    Also, my son was born a few days before a sposie child. My son is 8 months, crawling, and pulling up. The sposie child just learned to rollover and sit up. Cloth hasn't held him back

    ReplyDelete
  65. It is unfortunate that you chose prefolds, there are cloth diapers out there that would totally elevate most of your issues with cloth. I spent just over $500 on buttons diapers and best bottoms, these I am able to use from birth and will fit him through potty-training. The cost of washing them is minimal, considering it's only an extra two loads a week...we do 10-12 of just clothes anyway lol.

    They have a micro-fleece top that wicks away moisture so babies butt is never wet, even overnight!! and that same microfleece makes it super easy with poo, I just shake it over the potty and it rolls right off, I toss it in the washer, when the washer is full, I turn it on, then transfer them to the dryer and fold and put away...much less effort than lugging dirty diapers to the dumpster and running to the store every week for more disposables ;) ... But, that's just me lol

    Also, no one noticed that he had cloth unless they saw me changing him...they are super trim. I haven't noticed any issues trying to fit him into anything, nor has he any mobile issues.

    Just don't give up on cloth yet! Do a little more researching and don't be afraid to spread your wings a bit from prefolds and covers. That's where I started myself with my first baby and I have to say I LOVE cloth diapering my third baby now that we found best bottoms and buttons, they are a one size all in two :)

    ReplyDelete
  66. Sounds like you need RagaBabe in your lives. Prefolds are archaic.

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
  68. Cloth diapers led to Ammonia Burns on our baby. This is something many over zealous people fail to disclose in their blogs regarding the benefits of cloth diapers. We washed the heck out of the diapers after the first serious Ammonia burns (high and low temps, lots of detergents, lots of water, extra rinses) We are very clean people. The fact is, after a while the urine in cloth diapers crystallizes and ammonia build up happens. When our son would pee into his cloth diaper, he would experience an ammonia burn. It is unhealthy for him. Think about, do you want concentrated ammonia burning your sons or daughters genitals? The red rashes and sores from the ammonia are unforgettable. I felt so sorry that we did that to him thinking we were doing the smart thing with cloth diapers.

    Please do yourself and your baby a favour and use disposable, they are a better fit and your baby will be more comfortable while the develop.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're not supposed to do extra rinses. You didn't have a good wash routine simple as that. Next time get a good wash routine down from fluff love cloth diaper science on fb and don't give out bad advice when you didn't do it right!

      Delete
  69. This is 100% false. If you have a good washing routine, this doesn't happen. I've been cloth diapering for almost 4 years now and never had any issues with this. It doesn't matter how clean you are, you had a bad wash routine. That's it.

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
  72. We have a newly adopted 13 year old daughter whom we have in cloth diapers and rubberpants 24/7 and they work great for her! I buy the Gerber flat cloth diapers in the 24x27 inch size and pin them on her with diaper pins.Her rubberpants are adult size and fit blousy over the diapers.I use regular baby powder and lotion on her with the diapers.I dont mind washing the diapers and rubberpants and know we are doing our part to save the environment.

    ReplyDelete
  73. I'm sorry but everything about this is incorrect. Your obviously didn't have enough inserts in your diapers and didn't have a good wash routine if you were having to change 6 times in an hour. My son is also 6 months old and has been ii cloth since he was 2 months old. Hespecially been rolling since 4 months and crawling/sitting up since 5 months. I've also never had issues with leaking or blow outs since switching to cloth because I had a proper fit and wash routine for my little boy. Maybe you should check out fluff love university and fluff love cloth diaper science on fb and do actual research!

    ReplyDelete
  74. Anybody considering cloth please pay zero attention to this disaster of an article. I have 4 kids, I've used every kind of cloth available and every kind of disposable available it would seem and I finally found a system that works for us...it cost us under 200 total and will last from birth until potty trained. In disposables I was spending at least 100 a month in diapers, and wipes still need to be purchased separately. As to cars seats etc, cloth is completely safe (from the experts) because it's already compressed when baby is sitting on it. As to environmental impact of washing them, if you have a proper routine, with no extra rinses and no constant bleach which are both damaging to diapers, they can be washed with minimal increases in water usage. About blowouts, if you're having blowouts you're doing it wrong. Cloth is the only thing (yes even prefolds) that my kids don't explode out of EVERY SINGLE DAY....which also means I have far less regular laundry to wash every day as well. Cloth is also so much better for babies skin, without the chemicals. Disposables have caused us so many rashes, burns, etc that I will only use them in an emergency. And storing them is pretty easy, there are these things called wet bags that are awesome and cheap, get one. As to baby feeling wet? You can get a cheap $2 fleece blanket from walmart, the real thin ones they always have, and cut it into liners...they wick moisture away from baby and act as a stay dry layer. Finally diaper services are absolutely not the way to do cloth, it's virtually guaranteed they aren't being properly washed or sanitized every time(sanitization is super important because you're switching diapers between multiple babies), and way more money than its worth.

    ReplyDelete
  75. There's already several comments but this is such a terrible and uneducated article about cloth diapers.

    ReplyDelete
  76. There is SO much misinformation in this post. I have been cloth diapering my son and have experience very little issues, we actually have dealt with more in the couple of times i have used disposable on vacation then we ever have with cloth. Your kid is feeling wetness? Of course hes going to feel irritated, get yourself to walmart, buy a $2 microfleece blanket and cut it into rectangles to lay on top, and just like that hes nice and dry. You can also choose to buy pocket diapers, or buy fleece topped inserts, all of which will also keep his bottom nice and dry. As for more frequent changes, i change my son every couple of hours (unless he poops) which is how often you should be changing them in disposables as well. If you are having to change your child every 10 minutes then you are clearly not using the right type or amount of absorbant material for his wetness level.

    I dont know where you are getting this idea that cloth leaks more. Yes the diaper lays flat against the skin, but there are these wonderful things on the leg holes called elastics. They hold everything in. I have honestly NEVER had a leak while using a cloth diaper, disposables forget about it. You are going to be washing poop covered clothes several times a week.

    Ive never had an issue with clothing fitting. Less bulky diapers are an option if you are having that issue, or you could just buy their pants a size up and call it a day. As for "shelling out" for custom clothing, its not something that is a must. Ive purchased maxaloone pants for my child, at $25 a pair, but they fit from sizes 1-5 and will be used for several children. I figure in the end ill get my monies worth.

    Baby gear not fitting? This is the first ive heard this one. I have not had a single issue with my childs bottom being so bulky i couldnt fit a harness around him. The harnesses are adjustable for a reason, and even then i havent had to loosen it signifigantly to make room for his diaper. As for saying his carseat will be unsafe with the bulkiness of cloth, you have been misinformed. Cloth diapers are an exception to the bulkiness rule because they are already being compressed by the weight of the baby, so it is a non-issue.

    Travel, ill give you that one. We use disposables if we are travelling far. Not so much out of fear of using cloth while travelling, moreso just because we dont want to risk a strange washing machine chewing up our diapers. Or our luggage get lost with the diapers in there.

    Daycare is only an issue based on where you live and what type of provider you are looking for. We posted looking for a provider that was ok with using cloth, and we found her easily. There have been 0 issues in the year my child has been in daycare. Same goes for babysitters. There are other people out there that are as "crazy" as you are to use cloth diapers.

    ReplyDelete
  77. I had a moment of thought when my son rolled over for the first time while i was changing him that cloth might have been holding him back, until 5 minutes later, when despite having the diaper back on he rolled over again. It hasnt stopped him yet. He hit all of his milestones at a regular time and is now a running, rolling, jumping, busy little boy!

    Laundering cloth diapers is the easiest thing ive probably ever done, despite being so nervous about it in the beginning. I rinse poop and overnight diapers each day with a diaper sprayer, and once a week i throw the dirties in the washer with detergent, press a button, walk away and when i come back, wouldnt you know it theyre clean. No fuss no muss and i didnt have to do anything difficult or messy.

    Cost savings can absolutely be huge. I know of people who have been able to diaper 2+ children on an initial investment of $200 worth of diapers. Thats much much cheaper then you would ever be able to do with disposables.

    Personally, cloth diapering is the single greatest decision we made prior to welcoming her son. We plan to continue CDing with any future children, which for them will cost us nothing. There is also the piece of mind knowing i am keeping all of those horrible chemicals off my childs most delicate area. Cant ask for better then that!

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
  79. I cloth diaper my baby exclusively since birth. Sometimes her diaper is bigger than her head - in fact often it's the case. She still rolled over at 3 months and waa doing it consistently at 4 months. Cloth doesn't prevent babies from moving. That's just how it might appear to you.

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  80. Great insight. We cloth diapered our first and I experienced all the developmental delays you talk about. I do not remember when he first rolled over, but he didn't crawl until 10 months, did not pull to stand until 13, and did not walk until 17. Trying to buckle him into things was a nightmare. I'm currently 16 weeks pregnant with our second and crunching numbers. Right now we are looking at sewing our own prefolds out of receiving blankets, but will still be paying upwards of $60 for the covers for each stage. Appreciate both of your thoughts on this topic!

    ReplyDelete